↓Episode 35 – The RV Tool Box Essentials

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RV Tools  Not sure of what tools you should carry in your RV Tool Box? As an RV’er you never know when your RV is going to need a repair whether it is on the road or camping at your favorite get away. The one thing you do know is that you will experience problems that will require repairs. The other unknown is if it will happen when it is convenient with your local repair shop open for business or will it be on a weekend or at night when everybody is closed up tight? It will happen if it already hasn’t, breakdowns are part of the RV Experience. In reality though, don’t cars and boats need repairs? What about ATV’s and personal water crafts? My point is everything fails and for some reason when an RV has a problem it is classified as an absolute inconvenience, when it is just part of the experience.  Episode 35 covers this topic and I share with you my thoughts on what tools would be worth carrying and why. I also cover some items that are very handy to have on hand to get your problem solved when the stores are closed or late at night. Being prepared is worth its weight in gold. I know this from experience and a lifetime of Not having to call someone to do something I could do and did do myself. I will provide a list of tools and items I believe that should be part of the RV Tool Box and it can be found below and I will add & subtract as needed. Not all items or tools will work in every RV Tool Box! Open the box and listen now to the Entire Episode!

The RV Tool Box Contents!
Hand Tools:
• Socket Set Metric & American
• Wrench sets Metric & American
• Screw Drivers – Phillips and Flat Head
• 6 In 1 Type of Screw Driver with Torx Bits and a #1 & #2 Square Tip Bits
• Bit Driver for a Cordless Drill – with assortment of Bits: Square tip, Phillips, Sockets etc…
• Magnet Drive Guide – Usually Included in multi piece drive bit sets
• Channel Lock Style Pliers, Regular Pliers
• Wire Cutter, Wire Stripper and Wire Crimper
• Allen Wrench set
• Ball Peen hammers – Medium and Small
• Tools to Change Tire – Don’t assume your RV came with everything needed, sometimes they don’t.
• Volt Meter (110v & 12v)
• 12 Volt Test Light
• Cordless Drill & Drill Bits
• Pex Tubing Cutter
• P&T Relief Valve Tool
• Hack Saw – Spare Blades
• Tire Gauge that works with your tire pressure
Systems:
• Pex Tubing 2 -3 feet of 3/8 & ½ inch
• Flair It Fittings for Pex Tubing – Couplers for 1/2” & 3/8” female pipe thread, Couplers for female pipe thread to Pex tubing, Shut Off Valve, Pex • • Fitting with cap to close off line.
• Fuses – Check your RV styles. Mini, Maxi, ATO/ATC, Micro etc…
• Wire Ties
• Electrical Tape
• 14 & 16 Gauge Wire
• Wire Connectors
• Battery Terminal Cleaner or a Wire Brush
• Duct Tape
• Teflon Tape for water systems
• Gas/Propane Tape for LP fittings
• Spray 100% Silicone
• Spray Lubricant
• Assortment of screws, nuts and bolts for your RV
• Hose Clamps
• Rags & Paper Towels
Road Side Emergencies:
• Flairs and or LED type flairs
• Cones or Reflective Triangles
• Fire Extinguisher
• LED Flash Light
• Rechargeable LED Flashlight
• Spare Batteries
• High Quality Jumper Cables
• Ground Cloth
• Spare Tire
Some retailers recommend small portable air compressors to inflate your tires if they are low. Most of these inexpensive compressors won’t be able to bring RV tires up to the proper pressure. Most inexpensive tire compressors are junk! And quite often not worth the money. The best solution is to check out Power Tanks! Power tanks offers C02 Systems that are awesome! I have 2 of them for my vehicles.
Other Stuff:
• Rope
• Bungee Cords
• Work Gloves
• Scissors
• Shovel
• Pocket Knife
• 7’ Aluminum Ladder
Awning Emergencies – While Driving
• Box Cutter to Remove Fabric if needed
• Velcro Straps to Secure Awning Arms
• Wire Ties to Secure Awnings
• Tools to Remove awning if needed
In an emergency it might become necessary to remove the fabric or the complete awning on the roadside, be prepared to do so!

 

About the author, Eric

I have been a hands on DIY'er since childhood, yeah since childhood with the idea that the job has to get done. My job (not a career) history is not the typical job history. I have run successful multi-million dollar companies, I have started RV related businesses from ground up. Over the years I have acquired many skills, some self taught and taught by others in a hands on environment. Today everything I have learned over the decades has come together and now I love to help others and keep myself involved in my favorite industry, Recreational Vehicles! This is not even close to being finished......

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